The legal aspects of surveillance technology and its use in recent years

You can help by adding to it. February See also: Software law IT law does not constitute a separate area of law rather it encompasses aspects of contract, intellectual property, privacy and data protection laws.

The legal aspects of surveillance technology and its use in recent years

Examples of mostly behavioral characteristics include gait a person's manner of walking or voice.

The legal aspects of surveillance technology and its use in recent years

Facial recognition is the use of the unique configuration of a person's facial features to accurately identify them, usually from surveillance video. Another form of behavioral biometrics, based on affective computinginvolves computers recognizing a person's emotional state based on an analysis of their facial expressions, how fast they are talking, the tone and pitch of their voice, their posture, and other behavioral traits.

This might be used for instance to see if a person's behavior is suspect looking around furtively, "tense" or "angry" facial expressions, waving arms, etc.

The computers running the database are contained in an underground facility about the size of two American football fields. Surveillance aircraft Micro Air Vehicle with attached surveillance camera Aerial surveillance is the gathering of surveillance, usually visual imagery or video, from an airborne vehicle—such as an unmanned aerial vehiclehelicopteror spy plane.

Military surveillance aircraft use a range of sensors e. Digital imaging technology, miniaturized computers, and numerous other technological advances over the past decade have contributed to rapid advances in aerial surveillance hardware such as micro-aerial vehiclesforward-looking infraredand high-resolution imagery capable of identifying objects at extremely long distances.

For instance, the MQ-9 Reaper[87] a U. They have developed systems consisting of large teams drone planes that pilot themselves, automatically decide who is "suspicious" and how to go about monitoring them, coordinate their activities with other drones nearby, and notify human operators if something suspicious is occurring.

This greatly increases the amount of area that can be continuously monitored, while reducing the number of human operators required. Thus a swarm of automated, self-directing drones can automatically patrol a city and track suspicious individuals, reporting their activities back to a centralized monitoring station.

Data profiling can be an extremely powerful tool for psychological and social network analysis. A skilled analyst can discover facts about a person that they might not even be consciously aware of themselves.

In the past, this data was documented in paper records, leaving a " paper trail ", or was simply not documented at all. Correlation of paper-based records was a laborious process—it required human intelligence operators to manually dig through documents, which was time-consuming and incomplete, at best.

But today many of these records are electronic, resulting in an " electronic trail ". Every use of a bank machine, payment by credit card, use of a phone card, call from home, checked out library book, rented video, or otherwise complete recorded transaction generates an electronic record.

Public records—such as birth, court, tax and other records—are increasily being digitized and made available online. In addition, due to laws like CALEAweb traffic and online purchases are also available for profiling. Electronic record-keeping makes data easily collectable, storable, and accessible—so that high-volume, efficient aggregation and analysis is possible at significantly lower costs.

Information relating to many of these individual transactions is often easily available because it is generally not guarded in isolation, since the information, such as the title of a movie a person has rented, might not seem sensitive.

However, when many such transactions are aggregated they can be used to assemble a detailed profile revealing the actions, habits, beliefs, locations frequented, social connectionsand preferences of the individual.

The centers will collect and analyze vast amounts of data on U. It will get this data by consolidating personal information from sources such as state driver's licensing agencies, hospital records, criminal records, school records, credit bureaus, banks, etc. Millerdata held by third parties is generally not subject to Fourth Amendment warrant requirements.

Corporate[ edit ] Corporate surveillance is the monitoring of a person or group's behavior by a corporation. The data collected is most often used for marketing purposes or sold to other corporations, but is also regularly shared with government agencies.

- The Washington Post

Although there is a common belief that monitoring can increase productivity, it can also create consequences such as increasing chances of deviant behavior and creating punishments that are not equitable to their actions.Watch video · The city, with about , people, saw its police force dwindle from more than officers to about in recent years, and there is little hope of reinforcements.

All too often, the deployment of these technologies happens faster than our social, political, educational, or legal systems can react, producing a “land rush” in which companies and government agencies deploy new privacy-invasive technologies before subjects are aware that they exist—and certainly before we have consented to their use.

Apr 15,  · Employers can get into legal trouble if they ask interviewees about their religion, sexual preference, or political affiliation.

The legal aspects of surveillance technology and its use in recent years

Yet they can use social media to filter out job applicants based on their beliefs, looks, and habits. Laws forbid lenders from discriminating on the basis of Author: Vivek Wadhwa. The ACLU has been at the forefront of the struggle to prevent the entrenchment of a surveillance state by challenging the secrecy of the government’s surveillance and watchlisting practices; its violations of our rights to privacy, free speech, due process, and association; and its stigmatization of minority communities and activists disproportionately targeted by surveillance.

use of information technology and information security, security professionals can help keep an organization focused on its primary objectives. In the first part of this chapter, you learn about the legislation and regulations that affect the.

Nov 13,  · In striking a balance between constitutional rights, crime fighting, and national security, the legal doctrines at issue include everything from post-9/11 legislation that has given law enforcement access to electronic records, to constitutional rules governing criminal procedure, to the regulation of surveillance technology equipment by local ashio-midori.coms: 1.

Laws and Ethics Can’t Keep Pace with Technology - MIT Technology Review