Text based approach to teaching writing as a process

Updating the process approach: The Process Approach Most research in writing pedagogy today concludes that the most effective way to teach writing is through a process approach.

Text based approach to teaching writing as a process

An article discussing different models for the organization of language lessons, including Task-Based Learning. How often do we as teachers ask our students to do something in class which they would do in everyday life using their own language? Probably not often enough. If we can make language in the classroom meaningful therefore memorable, students can process language which is being learned or recycled more naturally.

Task-based learning offers the student an opportunity to do exactly this. The primary focus of classroom activity is the task and language is the instrument which the students use to complete it.

The task is an activity in which students use language to achieve a specific outcome. The activity reflects real life and learners focus on meaning, they are free to use any language they want.

Playing a game, solving a problem or sharing information or experiences, can all be considered as relevant and authentic tasks. In TBL an activity in which students are given a list of words to use cannot be considered as a genuine task. Nor can a normal role play if it does not contain a problem-solving element or where students are not given a goal to reach.

In many role plays students simply act out their restricted role. For instance, a role play where students have to act out roles as company directors but must come to an agreement or find the right solution within the given time limit can be considered a genuine task in TBL. In the task-based lessons included below our aim is to create a need to learn and use language.

That is not to say that there will be no attention paid to accuracy, work on language is included in each task and feedback and language focus have their places in the lesson plans. How can I use TBL in the classroom? Each task will be organized in the following way: Pre-task activity an introduction to topic and task Task cycle: A traditional model for the organization of language lessons, both in the classroom and in course-books, has long been the PPP approach presentation, practice, production.

With this model individual language items for example, the past continuous are presented by the teacher, then practised in the form of spoken and written exercises often pattern drillsand then used by the learners in less controlled speaking or writing activities.

Although the grammar point presented at the beginning of this procedure may well fit neatly into a grammatical syllabus, a frequent criticism of this approach is the apparent arbitrariness of the selected grammar point, which may or may not meet the linguistic needs of the learners, and the fact that the production stage is often based on a rather inauthentic emphasis on the chosen structure.

An alternative to the PPP model is the Test-Teach-Test approach TTTin which the production stage comes first and the learners are "thrown in at the deep end" and required to perform a particular task a role play, for example.

This is followed by the teacher dealing with some of the grammatical or lexical problems that arose in the first stage and the learners then being required either to perform the initial task again or to perform a similar task.

While this is not a radical departure from TTT, it does present a model that is based on sound theoretical foundations and one which takes account of the need for authentic communication. Task-based learning TBL is typically based on three stages. The first of these is the pre-task stage, during which the teacher introduces and defines the topic and the learners engage in activities that either help them to recall words and phrases that will be useful during the performance of the main task or to learn new words and phrases that are essential to the task.

This stage is followed by what Willis calls the "task cycle". Here the learners perform the task typically a reading or listening exercise or a problem-solving exercise in pairs or small groups. They then prepare a report for the whole class on how they did the task and what conclusions they reached.

Finally, they present their findings to the class in spoken or written form. The final stage is the language focus stage, during which specific language features from the task and highlighted and worked on.Teaching through Text: Reading and Writing in the Content Areas (2nd Edition) 2nd Edition.

For education leaders, creating actionable intelligence from data is a new skill. In this 4th industrial revolution, the ability to make better decisions, faster decisions against a backdrop of. Journal of Instructional Pedagogies Supporting the development, page 4 ROLE OF WRITING IN THE ACADEMY Writing is largely considered as a multifunctional tool in higher education teaching.

Whole language describes a literacy philosophy which emphasizes that children should focus on meaning and strategy instruction. It is often contrasted with phonics-based methods of teaching reading and writing which emphasize instruction for decoding and ashio-midori.comr, from whole language practitioners' perspective, this view is erroneous and sets up a false dichotomy.

product. The process approach focuses more on using techniques such as brainstorming, exploring ideas, peer editing, and rewriting. a genre based approach depends on the type of the texts that the students write.

text based approach to teaching writing as a process

The most modern approach is to combine and the genre approach. DIY literature lesson plan In our first Methodology article on Using Literature, there were two sample lesson plans based on an excerpt or a short story.

The Process Approach