Conventional view of communication

We will re-examine the history of content distribution and the history of copyright principles, and draw some connections between them, both traditional and novel. We will examine how we lost track of the ethics of copyright and got stuck in the trap of believing that ad-hoc, expedient solutions were instead immutable wisdom of the ages. In the end it should be clear that the introduction of the Internet and associated technologies constitute a qualitative change in communication technology that will require extensive further refinements This is a high-level summary, not an enumeration of the thousands of details added over the years.

Conventional view of communication

A Communication Model The first question that needs to be answered is, "Is there any need to re-analyze the ethical situation? We will re-examine the history of content distribution and the history of copyright principles, and draw some connections between them, both traditional and novel.

We will examine how we lost track of the ethics of copyright and got stuck in the trap of believing that ad-hoc, expedient solutions were instead immutable wisdom of the ages.

In the end it should be clear that the introduction of the Internet and associated technologies constitute a qualitative change in communication technology that will require extensive further refinements This is a high-level Conventional view of communication, not an enumeration of the thousands of details added over the years.

The intention is to lay the groundwork for a demonstration of the deep flaws in the current system.

Conventional view of communication

Because the conventional view freely mixes laws and ethics, this chapter will not go to great lengths to separate them either. I'm going to assume that the readers of this essay are already familiar with both the justifications for intellectual property and free speech, and the basic historical reasons for the creation of each of those, and do not need Yet Another Probably Oversimplified Anyhow Explanation of why Gutenberg's printing press more-or-less caused the creation of the concept of copyright.

Again, this is already long enough without rewriting that yet again. Therefore, since you know the basics of the conventional view of copyright, we can focus on synthesizing a new and better understanding of communication issues, rather then re-iterating conventional understandings.

Writing, sculpture, music, anything at all. Information can be communicated, which will be more carefully defined later. Yes, this is broad, but there is a rule of thumb: If it can be digitized, it's information. Note that digitization is very, very powerful. While few people may own the equipment to do it, there is no theoretical difficulty in digitizing sculpture, scent, motions, or many other things people may not normally consider digitizable.

Even things like emotions can be digitized; psychiatrists ask their patients to do so all the time "Describe how anxious you're feeling right now on a scale of 1 to While something like a written letter may be fully analog, one can generally create some digital representation that will represent the letter satisfactorily, such as scanning the whole letter and sending the image file.

The details of that transfer matter, and it's worthwhile to examine the history of those details. For the first time in history, the effort required to make a copy of a textual work was many times less then the effort required to create the original copy, thus making the production model of "Make an original copy of a book, then print thousands of copies of it quickly for a profit" practical.

Conventional

Ever since then, technology's primary effect is to lower the cost of various production models with various media until they are practical for an increasing number of people. Every major challenge to intellectual property law has come from this fundamental effect.

Though not strictly in chronological order as it is often difficult to place a date on when a given technology became truly practical. Pre-Gutenberg Practical Information Transmission You'll note there's only one black-dot, which is hand-copying material.

You'll also note that the graph has no axis labels. This is because there are, in reality, a lot of things that could go on those labels, like cost-per-copy extremely hightime per copy a lotnumber of customers waiting for product, etc.

I'll talk about some of the noteworthy parameters as we go through. At this point, there was no such thing as copyright. Copying was an unmitigated good for a society.

Numerous documents have disappeared from history because they weren't copied, now existing only as obscure references by other works which were successfully copied. Books, Magazines, Newspapers Gutenberg's invention added another possibility.

Conventional Means Of Communication. Webster’s Dictionary communication is “a sending, giving or exchanging of information, ideas etc.” Thus talking about modern means of communication I would mention two things – mobile phones and the Internet. When I use all these things everyday I sometimes recollect people who invented them. Conventional is an adjective for things that are normal, ordinary, and following the accepted way. Ho-hum. This word describes what is typical and ordinary and that which follows accepted standards of behavior or taste. “a conventional view of the world. TRANSNATIONAL TRENDS: THE CONVENTIONAL VIEW The search for transnational trends in political communication through comparative studies hardly seems old enough to have a history.

By lowering cost-per-copy and time-per-copy by orders of magnitude, it became practical to run thousands of copies of a book and sell each of them at a lower price then a single hand copy would cost. A significant time investment was required to set up each run, though, and that became a new constraining factor.

With this new ease of replication, the first rumblings of copyright law began, but it was still a very simple domain, so the laws were simple, at least by modern standards. Another side effect of Gutenberg's invention was the ability to reach an unprecedented number of people with the same message, because of the sheer number of copies that could be cranked out and delivered to people, rather then requiring the users to come to one of the rare copies of the content.

This introduces the notion of the scale of communication; throughout history, we have always treated communication reaching many people quite differently from private, 1-to-few communication.

Perhaps one of the most important effects was that such technology made it much easier to spread propaganda. Before such easy printing, propaganda required a network of people to verbally communicate it to the targets; printed propaganda, combined with wide-spread literacy, enabled much smaller groups to effectively use propaganda, which has obvious large effects on the fluidity of a society and the intensifying of common discourse.

As the printing press technology improved, people could set up content for the press faster. The lowering of the cost-to-setup enabled the invention of newspapers and by extensions all periodicalswhich are basically cost-effective periodic books. A new practical content distribution solution appeared, and it too affected the law.

People wanted to use this new platform for political purposes, but the centralized nature of the printing press made it easy to shut down if a powerful person disliked what the newspaper said. To counter this, our ethical concepts of free speech and the freedom of the press, initially synonymous, were created.

In America we even get this guaranteed as part of the first amendment to our constitution; your country may vary. Printing was a major improvement over hand copying, but it is not a perfect information distribution system.

The most obvious problem is the need for physical distribution of the printed materials, which was a major part of the cost.TRANSNATIONAL TRENDS: THE CONVENTIONAL VIEW The search for transnational trends in political communication through comparative studies hardly seems old enough to have a history.

Define conventional. conventional synonyms, conventional pronunciation, conventional translation, English dictionary definition of conventional.

adj. 1. Based on or in accordance with general agreement, use, or practice; customary: conventional symbols; a conventional form . communication because as important as this conventional view is for the day‐to‐day operations of organizations, I don’t think this view fully captures the complexities of organizing.

But again, I want to go deeper beyond this conventional view of organizational communication because as important as this conventional view is for the day‐to‐day operations of organizations, I don’t think this view fully captures the complexities of organizing and communicating in our society.

Define conventional. conventional synonyms, conventional pronunciation, conventional translation, English dictionary definition of conventional. adj.

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1. Based on or in accordance with general agreement, use, or practice; customary: conventional symbols; a conventional form . But again, I want to go deeper beyond this conventional view of organizational communication because as important as this conventional view is for the day‐to‐day operations of organizations, I don’t think this view fully captures the complexities of organizing.

The Conventional View Of Communication